1. Parenting
Send to a Friend via Email

Your suggestion is on its way!

An email with a link to:

http://kidsparties.about.com/od/diyideas/gr/HandmadeHellos.htm

was emailed to:

Thanks for sharing About.com with others!

Book Review: Handmade Hellos, by Eunice and Sabrina Moyle

About.com Rating 5 Star Rating

By

Handmade Cards, Handmade Hellos, book, Eunice Moyle, Sabrina Moyle, Hello Lucky, diy, do it yourself

Want to create handmade cards and invitations for your kid's next birthday party? Check out the book Handmade Hellos by Eunice and Sabrina Moyle for cute ideas that are easy to execute.

Image courtesy of Chronicle Books.

The Bottom Line

If you love paper crafts, you'll thoroughly enjoy this book. It's a compilation of projects by 22 different artists and crafters, so every idea is unique and inspiring.

The cards can be made for kids' birthday parties and holiday celebrations or they can be sent after an event as a thank you.

Even if you don't consider yourself an artist, you'll be successful making these cards because the instructions are so clear.

<!--#echo encoding="none" var="lcp" -->

Pros

  • Comes with an envelope of templates so you can make cards that actually look like the examples.
  • Projects from 22 different artists and crafters, so none of the cards or styles look repetitive.
  • Most of the cards are gender neutral, so don’t be afraid to buy this book if you have sons.
  • It's a spiral-bound book--handy when you’re working on a project and want to leave the book open.

Cons

  • I can’t think of anything wrong with this book. Just hoping they'll come out with Part II!

Description

  • Handmade Hellos
  • Authors: Sabrina and Eunice Moyles Photographer: Sheri Giblin Illustrator: Sarah Labieniec
  • Chronicle Books, 2008
  • 144 pages, plus an envelope of templates
  • ISBN: 978-0-8118-6239-4

Guide Review - Book Review: Handmade Hellos, by Eunice and Sabrina Moyle

I’m a D.I.Y. mama, especially when it comes to birthdays. I love making handmade favors, treats and decorations for my kids’ parties.

But handmade cards and invitations have always been hard for me. I’m not an artist, so everything I’ve attempted has looked very amateur and has rarely made it into the mail.

Not anymore. Handmade Hellos’ clear instructions, templates and clever designs makes it easy to create professional-looking cards at home. The projects in the book are unique and can be applied to many birthday themes and holidays.

Some of my favorite ideas are:

  • A pop-up pirate card made on a sheet of run-of-the-mill notebook paper.
  • A blue-ribbon badge congratulations card that you could give to a child after an important accomplishment, like earning a new belt in karate or performing in a school play.
  • Animal silhouette cards made from patterned paper or fabric, which would be perfect for an animal- or zoo-themed birthday party.
  • A Humpty Dumpty card where Humpty Dumpty is an inky thumbprint. What kid wouldn't love helping you make those?
  • A card designed to look like a book with a library check-out card inside, onto which you could print the party details.
  • An owl made from paper scraps and googly eyes because--let’s face it--kids go bonkers for googly eyes.

If you enjoy sending top-quality cards, Handmade Hellos will save you money. Custom or high-end cards usually cost a pretty penny. By following the instructions in this book, you can make them yourself for a fraction of the price.

By the way, the book includes instructions for making your own envelopes, so your handmade invitations can coordinate perfectly with their envelopes.

The book is written for an adult audience, and, yes, some of the projects could only be made by grownups (or kids with lots of patience and some artistic talent).

But many of the cards can either be done by children themselves or with assistance from a parent--even if that parent thinks they lack creative skills.

Best of all, the kids will feel proud knowing they made the invitations they’re sending for their parties or the thank you cards that go in the mail after the birthday is over.

Or, pour yourself a cup of tea and make the cards yourself after the kids go to bed. You’ll have a ball being creative and crafty.

P.S. If you like Handmade Hellos, take a look at Hello! Lucky, the card-making company in San Francisco owned by authors Sabrina and Eunice Moyles, who are sisters. They specialize in paper products made using vintage letterpress printing presses from the 1950s.

<!--#echo encoding="none" var="lcp" -->
Related Video
How to Make Mouth Pop-Up Cards
Kids and Sunburns
  1. About.com
  2. Parenting
  3. Kids' Parties & Celebrations
  4. DIY Ideas
  5. Handmade Cards - Handmade Cards

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.